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20121201
20121201
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. >>> america has a spending problem, and washington is having a problem fixing t.republicans are okay with raising more revenue, but they don't want to raise taxes to do it. democrats only want to raise taxes on the top 2% and extend the bush tax cuts for everyone else. what they might agree on, cutting deductions. the middle class' most cherished tax break could be in the crosshairs of the fiscal cliff negotiations. we're talking about the mortgage interest deduction. it's been around for 99 years, but it's costing the government $80 billion this year and will reach $100 billion by 2014 making it the third largest tax expenditure according to the congressional research service. who is it really helping in the most recent irs tax data show 41 million people claim this deduction on their 2010 taxes, but the tax policy center points out it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. for those with annual incomes of less than $40,000 a year, the average tax savings is just 91 bucks. for the people earning $250,000 a year, the annual tax savings runs about $5,500, and critics s
the party line seemed to be more stark and obvious than they were then some of my early days in washington. we have four experts who will discuss the developments and essentially the filibuster. it has to do with senate procedure and presidents and senate rules and senate precedents on the other. you're going to hear from for individuals with a depth of experience in these matters. let me introduce everyone. in no particular border, we have james wallner from guesswork for the house and the senate and he currently serves as executive director and an adjunct professor in the congressional and presidential studies program he has a masters and phd in politics. james is a very astute observer in this senate. i can tell you from first-hand experience. the second speaker will be norman ornstein. he is a long-term observer of politics and he is an analyst at cbs news. he is the author of several books, which you may have read. the broken branch, how congress is failing america, and the permanent campaign of the future, and most recently, it's even worse than it looks, the new politics of extremis
right now in washington, and i was cheered to see the president's opening bid, but the consensus in washington is that we have to come up with a grand bargain, dot dot dot we have to do something with entitlements. this is the big thing. something about entitlements. i just don't understand why that's the case. the reason i don't understand why that's the case is the big problem is the rate of growth of health care costs. i think we can all agree on that, right? >> yes. >> now medicare -- the rate of growth in medicare is significantly lower than the rate of growth of health care costs in the private sector. it's doing a better job of controlling cost relative to the private sector. then we just passed a huge bill that was incredibly contentious, which is called the affordable care act. the vast majority of the legislative language of which is about controlling costs in health care over the future. so it seems to me like the reasonable thing to do is to wait four years, five years, implement the bill and see if the cost control measures that have been put it in place, fought abou
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3

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